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Give Blood Play Hockey Tees Available at Nashville Predators Blood Drive

Tennessee Valley

December 21, 2011
 

Nashville Predators Host Red Cross Blood Drive

Give Blood Play Hockey T-shirts for all Blood Drive Participants

 

 

(Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 21, 2011)

 

The Nashville Predators are out for blood, but not from another NHL team.  The Nashville Predators are sponsoring an American Red Cross blood drive and encouraging their fans to donate. 

 

It only takes about an hour to donate blood.  In that hour, you can unwrap a lifetime of memories for hospital patients in your community and across the country.  The need for blood is constant and doesn’t pause for the holidays.  By taking time to donate this winter, you can help the Red Cross ensure a stable blood supply for all patients who need blood products.

 

You are invited to give blood at the Nashville Predators blood drive on Wednesday, Dec. 28, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bridgestone Arena located at 501 Broadway in Nashville. 

 

Walk-in blood donors are welcome.  You may also schedule your donation appointment by calling 1-800-RED CROSS or logging on to redcrossblood.org and entering sponsor code:  Preds19.

 

Anyone who presents to donate blood at the Nashville Predators blood drive receives a voucher for a pair of tickets to an upcoming game and a Give Blood Play Hockey T-shirt, while supplies last.

 

 

How to Donate Blood:

Call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org for more information or to make an appointment. All blood types are needed to ensure the Red Cross maintains an adequate blood supply. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Donors must be in general good health, weigh at least 110 pounds and be at least 17 years old (16 with completed Parental Consent Form). New height and weight restrictions apply to donors 18 and younger. 

 

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation's blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.