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American Red Cross, National Baptist Convention, Inc. celebrate national partnership to educate communities

Missouri-Illinois

September 3, 2010
 

The American Red Cross and the National Baptist Convention, Inc. are celebrating the one-year anniversary of a national partnership with the goal of uplifting communities by focusing on the importance of healthy lifestyles, volunteer service and disaster readiness.

 

A new element of the partnership will take place at the National Baptist Convention Annual Session in Kansas City, when the Red Cross will launch the “Gift of Life” Blood Campaign, together with its Honorary Chair, Josephine Scruggs, the wife of Dr. Julius R. Scruggs, president of the National Baptist Convention.  This historical event will kick off from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 8 at the

Kansas City Convention Center, 301 W. 13th St.

 

Among other objectives, the two organizations will attempt to educate attendees and other African-Americans about the importance of blood donation. Certain blood types are unique to specific racial and ethnic groups. Therefore, it is essential that the donor diversity match the patient diversity.

 

Additionally, sickle cell disease is prevalent in the African-American community, and the best match for these patients is most often found in a donor with the same ethnic background.

 

“We are extremely excited to be partnering with the National Baptist Convention,” said Vincent A. Edwards, Executive Director of the Metropolitan Blood Program for the American Red Cross. “Their Annual Session is a significant event and a perfect opportunity for us to help educate the African-American community about blood donation. We believe this is truly a win-win situation.”

“Our participation in this Red Cross blood drive gives us the opportunity to minister to the world,” said Dr. Scruggs.

For more information or to schedule an appointment to donate at the “Gift of Life” Drive, people may call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcrossblood.org. Walk-ins will be accepted but appointments are encouraged.