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Shenandoah High School students, staff remember beloved coach Chad Van Houten at Nov. 5 blood drive

Midwest

October 22, 2013
 
 SHENANDOAH, Iowa – When Chad VanHouten passed away following a tragic car accident in July, Shenandoah High School lost a beloved coach, mentor and friend. To honor VanHouten, the Nov. 5 Shenandoah High School blood drive is being held in his memory.
 
Both Shenandoah High School athletic director Bob Sweeney and nurse Linda Laughlin described the former Shenandhoah High School girls volleyball coach as an all-around good person who was supportive, caring, positive and fun.
 
 “Chad cared so much for others,” Sweeney said. “Giving blood is an act of caring and helping others, both things that Chad did each and every day.”
 
“It’s no surprise that the students would honor him in this way,” said Laughlin.
 
Though the blood drive is hosted by Shenandoah High School, the entire community is invited to pay tribute to VanHouten by donating blood. All blood types are needed, especially types O negative, A negative and B negative.
 
Blood drive in memory of Chad VanHouten
Tues., Nov. 5 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Shenandoah High School gym, 1000 Mustang Dr., Shenandoah
To make an appointment, please call Mary Peterson at 712-246-4727. Donors may also register online at redcrossblood.org.
 
Blood collected at the blood drive in memory of VanHouten may be used for trauma victims, heart surgery patients, organ transplant patients, premature babies and patients with cancer or diseases like sickle cell disease.
How to Donate Blood
Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license, or two other forms of identification are required at check-in.  Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental permission in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. 
 
About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.
 
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